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poet

I have enjoyed writing for as long as I can remember. My teachers often commended me and I gained top marks for my writing.

When I turned 16 (I’m now 49)  I joined a rock band and soon began writing music for the band. We played classic rock music. By the age of 22 I left the band to focus on a nursing career. I still wrote rock music as I recorded at home for myself. I am a multi-instrumentalist. I also now had the time to write poetry, begin a blog and started making notes for a novel. Each format requires a different approach to writing.

 

  • Rock Music

I found writing rock music rather easy. It generally has a set format.  Verse-chorus-verse-chorus-instrumental break-verse-chorus-chorus. Sometimes the last verse can be the same as the first.

The nature of rock music allows for rather superficial lyrics. Not a lot of thought is required but a catchy chorus helps. Lyrics in rock music tend to take second place behind the music of the band and the effects added in the studio after recording.

 

  • Poetry

Poetry has always come easy to me. Irrespective of the length of a poem or whether it  rhymes or not, I generally write a poem in ten minutes. If it takes more than that or I have to stop and think about it then the spontaneity is gone and poetry, to me, is the most spontaneous form of literature.

If one has to think about a poem or plan it, it becomes contrived and this is obvious to the seasoned poetry reader.

If you aren’t at your keyboard and have a poem spring to mind, remember where you were when you had the inspiration. It works.

 

  • Novels

Novels are a whole different thing. The trick with writing is to relax your way through it. There’s no rush. You have plenty of time to proof read it.

When I’m writing a novel I begin by writing what I call a ‘skeleton.’ This is the bare bones of the story and is probably the hardest part to do. I do it in point form, ensuring that things run in chronological order. As a character appears I give a full description of them.

After completing the skeleton, I begin from the start and begin writing the novel proper, expanding on each point as I go. If you get the skeleton right then writing the novel itself should be a stimulating experience.

I then go back and check the skeleton and compare it with the novel proper as I go.

It’s a long process and you can find yourself changing the skeleton at odd hours….but what’s the hurry?

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